Thank you for the music .

Last night some kind friends took us to a concert. It was a tribute act for Billy Fury. (A great and popular singer in the sixties and seventies who left us way too soon.) The backing group and main singer took to the stage and were applauded politely by the (rather senior) audience. The show got underway – telling the story of the life of Billy Fury through song and with movie reels, and was both enjoyable and moving – reminding us of an era which is gone but not forgotten.

Whilst sitting in the auditorium listening and reminiscing, I started thinking about time; about what happened to the intervening years that took me from being a wannabe flower child to a mature woman with nine grandchildren! And how did some of the pop stars with often risqué performances I revered in my youth become sensible chaps with cardigans?

Time slips by as we all know. As we are often told, we need to treasure every moment. Sometimes life throws a spanner in the works but I do my best to enjoy life and be thankful for so many of the wonderful blessings I have been given. Ageing can be something some us struggle to come to terms with and I can only hope that I face it with grace and fortitude but also that life treats me kindly.

I recently watched a program tracing the lives of people who have died and left no known relatives. The programme is always very poignant and I watch as various  lives unfold on the screen – sometimes they are people who have not had anyone to care for them or no living relatives, sometimes they feature people who have lived a reclusive life or fallen on hard times. The feeling of loneliness and sadness seems to prevail; yet often the people are highly spoken of by those who had looked after or met the people concerned. Sometimes distant relatives are traced and express sadness or remorse for not having had contact with them. But sometimes the people concerned seemingly had no one in the world to call their own. A heartbreaking thought. One particular lady who had died had lived for some time in a care home. The staff spoke kindly of her and mentioned that they sometimes took the inpatients on a trip out. Whenever this particular lady was asked where she would like to go she always chose the local garden centre. She loved plants and would bring some back and plant them in the garden at the care home. She was a lovely lady by all accounts and yet seemed to have no friends or relatives who visited. I often think about her when I go to the garden centre now and I wish I could have known her.  I like to think her memory lives on in a lovely flower garden somewhere.

It is always good when someone leaves a legacy, be it small or large, flowers or music, love and gentleness.  So I say : ‘Thank you for the flowers. Thank you for the music,’ to those who have gone before.

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Blessings to you.

 

Pull Yourself Together Nurse!

There has been so much in the news lately about our emergency services, our hospital workers, medics, fireman and all the heroes we couldn’t possibly do without. Should they have a pay rise – excuse me? Should they have a pay rise – of course we know the answer to that!

I thought it may be interesting this week to interview a nurse who trained in the 1970’s!

What made you decide to become a nurse?

I had wanted to become a nurse ever since I can remember. I never thought about doing anything else. To me the dream of becoming a nurse was always with me. I devoured every book about nursing I could get my hands on, and I loved a program around at the time called ‘Emergency Ward 10’. I think the thought of wearing a nurses uniform, especially the iconic cloak criss-crossed at the front, played a part in my ambition to tread the wards! And of course, it was in my heart to care for people.

How easy was it to be accepted for training?

Not that easy! Mainly because my careers advisor at school was affiliated to the local shirt factory and his main mission in life was to recruit young girls to work there. He was convinced nursing would be too tough for me and gave me no help at all. Not to be deterred I applied to a teaching hospital in Bristol and was accepted. It’s strange, because I was very shy and quiet, but I found determination from somewhere!

Did you settle in well to your new life away from home?

No! I was very homesick and at just eighteen years of age and having never been away from home before, it was a big shock to the system! The nurse’s home where I had lodgings was a former mental hospital – an austere,  grey brick building situated on the outskirts of the city. We were bussed  in to the hospital every day, or night if we were on night shift, – quite a sight with thirty or so ‘angels’ as we were sometimes called, all seated in rows with starched caps on.

But you settled in eventually?

Yes, I did settle eventually but it did take a while. There was so much to learn and the hours were long and arduous. Also, we had to learn to cope with life and death at a relatively young age. There is nothing like being left alone in the middle of the night looking after a ward full of sick patients to concentrate the mind!

What do you think of now when you look back?

I remember so many of my patients to this day. Laughing with them and crying with them. I remember the bond with my fellow nurses; the times you had to laugh in dire circumstances otherwise you wouldn’t have been able to cope. I remember collapsing in helpless giggles during a practical exam when an arm fell off the dummy patient – ‘Nurse! You may have killed the patient  – go back to your seat and pull yourself together!’ I remember wistfully watching friends who weren’t nurses going out at weekends to enjoy themselves whilst I was invariably working. I remember some of the dishy doctors walking around importantly in their flapping white coats. I remember being told we could only have three inches of water in our baths at the nurse’s home so as not to be wasteful. I remember being constantly hungry and the awful hospital food. I remember the weirdness of eating gristly beef casserole at breakfast after coming off night duty. I remember bossy ward sisters who made us tremble with fear as they entered the ward. I remember a lot of unfairness and petty rules and a fellow nurse running off in despair when being reprimanded for pinching a sausage from the kitchen. I remember kindness too. Doctors crushed with tiredness after being on call for many hours and still managing to tenderly lift an elderly lady up who had fallen out of bed. I remember the commaraderie when working in the accident and emergency department at night – the policeman coming in to share a cup of coffee and have a quick game of cards during a rare quiet spell in the early hours.

Would you still become a nurse if you had the time again?

That’s a tough one. I like to think I would as it taught me so much about life and I wouldn’t  have encountered so many deep experiences anywhere else.  Also I met my husband during my training. But honestly, when you hear that nurses are leaving in droves to work abroad now it shows how demoralised nurses are and I’m not sure I would want to work under the difficult and strained conditions.

So how do you view the profession today?

I haven’t worked in hospital for a good while now so it is difficult to judge first hand.  All I can say from what I’ve noticed when visiting people is that a lot of nurses do their  best but time issues and understaffing mean that a lot of the caring side of nursing seems to have disappeared to the detriment of the patients. Back in the sixties and seventies it wasn’t perfect, but the wards were kept scrupulously clean; wards were often ruled with a rod of iron, but there was order. There was plenty of clean laundry, a ward clerk on every ward and most importantly, patients were not sent home until they were fit to be discharged. Sadly I have had first hand experience that shows this isn’t always the case now. I would still say though, that there are a lot of wonderful and caring nurses out there who do their very best under difficult circumstances.

A poem about Night Duty!

Please don’t run nurse

And please turn off the light,

Your patient may be getting worse

But it’s the middle of the night.

Call the doctor to attend

The latest emergency case

Then go and lay the trolley up,

And sterilise the place.

Make sure all the patients

Are safely in their beds,

I’ll be coming round to check

That they have had their meds.

And be sure to know every name

And diagnosis too,

Of every patient in your care,

Or I’ll be reporting you.

Write up the notes before morning,

Make the porridge and the tea,

Get everybody washes and fed

Then report back to me.

Go home and get some sleep

You’ve got six more nights ahead,

So get used to working extra hard,

While your friends are home in bed.

(c) Lyn Halvorsen

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Hold Fast To All That is Good

I seem to have been writing so often lately about heartbreak and sadness  – so much has happened in our country to render us bereft and fearful. Our hearts are troubled as more and more tragic, dreadful and appalling occurrences unfold in front of our eyes as we view our television screens. How much can some people take we ask ourselves; what can we do to help others and also keep ourselves safe? We become full of doubt; how can this happen? Why is our country and its people suffering in such awful ways? How can a rich borough of London be home to such a terrible fire , possibly caused through blatant neglect of public safety? There may be some who in their hearts know the answers, but for most of us we have to carry on somehow, and meanwhile the books of condolences are filled with words from grieving hearts, and the flowers continue to be laid all around the sites of the latest disaster.

The heat in the country this week has not really been welcomed – its as though nature is contriving to add to our discomfort; we have trouble even resting at night. We do not wake refreshed and we find it hard to concentrate on our daily routine. I got to thinking that any extreme is hard to cope with. We search for equilibrium and balance in all things – at least I do. It’s easier to cope with life when we can jog along at a steady pace, walk around without feeling fearful of what lurks around the corner, and know that everything is in order. But of course, nothing stays like that for long, and when things go badly wrong we have to dig deep to find strength to cope. It is at times like these that the smallest things seem to help us – getting out into the garden, walking in the woods, hugging the grandchildren and reading them a funny story. We can share a coffee with friends, help our neighbour, offer someone a word or two of kindness. Just going through the motions of routine tasks can get us through the days that are difficult.

 As always in times of dreadful disaster, we see the kindness of strangers shine through. People pull together and are incredibly brave and courageous. They give. They give money they don’t really have; they give people comfort,  both materially and physically; they give love and show compassion. That’s when we realise how much goodness there is in this time of utmost suffering.

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We often find that the widest our experience is, the deeper our tolerance. Wisdom comes from all the ups and downs we have gone through in our lives and how we have dealt with them. And with wisdom comes a knowing. Knowing not to give advice unless asked for it; not making assunptions and forming opinions, not making judgements. It’s knowing we don’t always get things right and being ready to hold our hands up and admit it when we get things wrong. Mainly wisdom gives us courage. Courage to reach out when we see someone in need even if we have to step out of our comfort zone to help them. Courage to face our own demons.  Courage to step out and keep going in this scary world. Courage to stand up for what we believe in a peaceful, honest and informed manner.

One of my sons once said to me that it is what we do when no one is looking that counts and I have found this to be so true in life. If we can go forth with a light heart we can find it easier to cope with that which life throws at us.

In these times of darkness we pray for all those who’s hearts are breaking. We pray they will find some peace and will be wrapped in the love and comfort of open and loving arms.

Most of all we remember that when we all look to the future with love in our hearts, and unite in peace, we will be lifted up together.

Blessings to you.

More Then One Way to Look at Things…

I read an interesting piece about choice today – how we choose to act and react. What do we do when things don’t go how we want them too? And how do we react when we feel things go our way?   Yesterday we woke up to the news that the  general election here in Britain had resulted in a hung parliament – not the news a lot of us wanted whichever way we voted. The day’s news programs were focused very much on the reactions of all the politicians, their demeanours and their varying attitudes. Depending on which party they represented, and how their own particular region had fared, there were mixtures of sadness and dismay, excitement and victory, tempered with grim resignation and ill concealed gloating. Then came the time to find someone or something to blame/praise for the way the voting went. Calls went out for resignations. Bitterness ensued. There was either defeat or victory but not much in the way of genuine selflessness in between.

I got to thinking about how we feel when we disagree with how our own particular country is run and the difference between anarchy and democracy. The normal definition of anarchy is to do with the condition of society, an entity, group of people, or a single person that rejects hierarchy. In practical terms, anarchy can refer to the curtailment or abolition of government. It can also designate a nation that has no real system. In other words we think of a country with no structure and a country that dissolves into chaos. We imagine riots and turmoil. All things most of us would fear. But if you think about the definition of democracy we think of the belief in freedom and equality between people, or a system of government based on this belief; elected by the choice of the people. The whole population. The power of the country vested in the people.

But is this really the case?  Is there a different way of viewing anarchy versus democracy? Perhaps it is easy to assume we have choice because we know we live under a democratic government , but actually do we really have choice? We still have to follow rules, we are still helpless at times and cannot always live in the way we would really choose. We have to live with certain constraints and can’t always follow the paths we would wish to. We have to ‘toe the line’ while we see others exhibiting signs of greed and power which we cannot challenge. How can this be when we have personally been part of the  electoral system and are supposed to have a say in how things are done? Perhaps with a bit more knowledge and courage we could hold more people accountable for their actions when they try and control our banks or our hospitals for example. Perhaps we can think of a new kind of anarchy – a compassionate anarchy. This may require human beings to be willing to be authentic; be independent and dare to rebel in a positive way that helps society question things that cause unrest, and live in a healthier way without hurting others. With a more unstructured but more equal society we would have to work hard to make things work and remain harmonious. Could it be done? A lot of us are used to being in our comfort zones. We sense things are not great but are nervous of trying to create change. We think we are lucky in the main to live the way we live now and this is true.

But there is not really any ‘right’ way. If we live our lives with purpose and follow what we feel is right,  do what we really want to do to make our own lives better, make the best of what we have, and be grateful, then we may achieve some balance. Whenever people act with integrity and for the common good, are kind and compassionate and want the best for everyone and not just for themselves and their own immediate world, then we have, automatically, not anarchy, not democracy, but the best conditions for fair and honest living.

Blessings to you.

 

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Sea of Love

I’m struggling for ideas this week. Sometimes words just flow from the pen and other times one searches for any excuse to get up and move away from the blank page or the keyboard. These are the times I don the headphones, put the favourite music on and tramp through the woods. Spring is at its prime and the hedgerows and the fields are at their most vibrant. The blackbirds are busily feeding their chicks and nature seems at its most busiest. How could one not be inspired?

Sometimes, at times like, these I am prompted by the lines of a favourite song or the words from a favourite guru. There is so much to be grateful for and so many heartfelt words that make my own heart sing. So today, I’d like to share with you some of my own words, they are taken from the inspiration of others, so they are not totally mine, and yet, they are. All things come from little threads we pick up and blend into our own tapestry of life.

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Do you spend too much time worrying? Cast your cares aside, even if jut for a moment. Start again tomorrow.

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Do you sometimes feel confused and wonder what life is all about for a moment, and then suddenly you catch the notes of a familiar well loved song, or read some old notes you wrote long ago and all of a sudden, things fall into place again? You remember what is important to you. You feel like things are okay.

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And when you really do need to be uplifted……

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Blessings to you.

Flags of Peace.

When dreadful things happen in our world we feel at a loss to know what to do. Maybe we feel rage and question how any higher being could let such atrocities happen. I like to think of the explanation a close friend gives when he says it is not until we move on from this world to the next that we will know real peace and all our questions will be answered. He likens it to the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle finally fitting together and forming the picture we have waited for all along. All we can do today is pray for all the broken hearts.

I wish that I had special powers

And could turn everything around

So we could change the way we look at things,

And keep our feet upon the ground.

To ask the floating clouds above

To spill the gentle rain,

To water the dry and barren land

And make it green again.

And could I harness the force of the wind,

Calm the raging sea,

Reign over nature’s wayward mind,

And let it quietly be?

For every child in every land,

There would be food enough to eat,

Arms stretched out to hold them tight,

And shelter from the heat.

And what if I could ask the world

To find the path to peace,

With every country’s flags unfurled

As all the wars have ceased?

But if I cannot change the world,

I can bend when the storm appears,

Do great things in smaller ways,

Dry another’s tears.

For I alone cannot decide

The way the world should be,

And I cannot begin to know

What there is still to see.

Lyn Halvorsen (c)

Blessings to you.

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Well this is nice….

This week at Dove Lane has seen me questioning a few things. I’ve been working quite prolifically lately – writing is my passion and I’m more than happy when I have some time to sit at my desk and write for my various projects. I’m lucky to be able to do what I love.  But there’s the thing. Sometimes writing takes us to different places than we are used to; different spheres and different continents even. Sometimes it takes us right out of our comfort zone. I like to write from the heart and I shy away from stuff that’s too controversial, or too, as my father would say ‘near the mark’. I try to write about things that have a ‘feel good’ factor, or throw a light on a subject that may reflect someone getting a bad deal in my view. This doesn’t mean I don’t reflect on the bad news that unfolds everyday in front of our eyes in the media. I do. But I think there is enough out there already to fill a thousand other features if you want to read them. I don’t shy away from listening to heart rendering news and sometimes it does colour my writing and maybe even my judgement, but when I write here I try to help you keep a step away from the hustle of everyday life, if even just for the few minutes you may take out of your day to read my blog. (A big thank you for that🙂)

But this week someone mentioned that my writing was a bit too ‘nice’.  Maybe a bit like a pleasant conversation. Hmm. That was a bit thought provoking. And in the context of what the person was referring to, they were right. Sometimes I need to toughen up my writing skills and dig deeper. There is a lot more waiting. The pool of new ideas is unfathomably deep. And I know my soul hears echoes from deep and dark places that sometimes have to be explored.

But I was taken right back to my school days when reflecting on my ‘nice’ description. One didn’t dare use the word nice in an essay or the said essay would not have had the chance of being marked with a coveted A+. We were told never to use the word nice; there was always a better word to use. I feel guilty to this day if I use nice as an adjective, even verbally.

However. Look up nice in the dictionary and this is what you read : Nice – pleasant, likeable, agreeable, personable, charming, delightful, amiable, affable, friendly, kindly, genial, good-natured, engaging, gracious, sympathetic, understanding, compassionate, good …I could go on. Quite, er, nice really.

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Who could not be happy with those descriptions, certainly if one is viewed in that way it is more than pleasing. There are times when writing I will need to ‘get real’ and assert myself; dig deep when I need to.  But there is a lot of nasty stuff out there and sometimes we need to escape a bit. So I will still be happy to write about ‘nice’ stuff, at least here. I will be light, be fluffy and scatter hearts and flowers. I will ‘nice’ the life out of my musings at times. I will still write my blog with compassion and be peaceful.

I will still feature the sayings that help make the world go round.

One I liked today…..

‘Do not forget small kindnesses and do not remember small faults.’

                      Chinese Proverb.

In the future I will not chastise myself when I use the ‘nice’ word – I won’t even mind if I’m deemed to be a bit lightweight and bit cheesy. I really could think of worse things. I might get a bit bolshy though.

Blessings to you.

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