When You Look at Good Things (and you don’t win the lottery)

Happiness comes from the simpler things

Here at Dove Lane my husband looked eagerly at an email in his inbox this morning – without his spectacles on. Squinting at the screen he saw there was information regarding a lottery win. He saw a 5 but wasn’t sure how many noughts…A lunge for the glasses and a closer look revealed he had won. £5. Ah well, I guess we don’t think about moving to the palatial mansion by the sea yet.

Whether we had won £500, £5,000 or £5,000,000, how would our lives have changed and would we have been happier if the amount had been in the millions? Initially maybe. But what about in the long term? The way we respond to a windfall depends on where we are in life and the circumstances that surround us. To some people in the world £5 would be more than just loose change, it could mean perhaps the chance for a hungry family to eat for a week,  yet all we felt when we won it was disappointment. £500 would give us cause to be excited but it wouldn’t be life changing, yet to others it could be. £5,000 may make us jump up an down a bit – perhaps we could put it towards buying a new car or a holiday. But £5,000,000 – wow wouldn’t that be something? Now we’re talking!

Or are we?

I could write pages about how winning large amounts of money would benefit us, and what we would do with that sort of cash, but that is not really what I’m thinking about here. I can’t pretend it wouldn’t be welcome – of course it would, but the question is, how important is it for our happiness to be financially rich? What really makes us happy? Are rich people actually any happier in the long run? Can money really buy you happiness, good health or better relationships? Maybe yes. But then again, maybe not. Maybe it brings added complications, arguments over how the money is distributed , even isolation.

For many of us, happiness comes from simpler things and the smaller things in life. In fact, it is the small things in life that are the most important. Always have been and always will be.

Look beyond money. It isn’t everything. Sometime too much of it (or too little)  may even cloud our judgement. So when we look at inspiring stories, and even look at heartwarming pictures unrelated to financial aspirations we can be grounded. Also, even if we don’t have much personal wealth it is good to be generous. Not necessarily with money but with our time, hospitality and compassion.

We sometimes need motivation to be more kind and compassionate. Everyday life encompasses us,  and in the hustle and bustle of everyday life we may forget sometimes that we need to stop and look at the good happenings around us. When we watch others perform acts of kindness, and witness human goodness we boost the optimistic side of our character and then pay if forward ourselves.

If we choose a good attitude we will go a long way in reminding ourselves that we have everything we need. Again, implement simple strategies that help – smiling even when you don’t feel like it, taking time out to give loved ones your full attention. Taking time out to care for yourself. Do one thing at a time and help your day go smoothly.

This week I feel exhausted, I have been working very long hours but it is all in a good cause. I have read many, many inspiring stories and seen many speakers and teachers give up their time free of charge for the Winspiration Day project that I am an ambassador for. (Read more about Winspiration Day here : http://www.winspirationday.org/ ) It has been incredible to be working on this project and to see how so many people believe in working and uniting together to make the world a better place.

My blog may be a bit disjointed this week. I apologise for that but after a long day I hope a few of my jumbled thoughts make sense! And this was a round about way of saying most of us haven’t won the millions tonight but there we go. I may buy a ticket at the weekend though. Just in case.